Celery Juice

Posted on 15. Jun, 2013 by in Healthy Juice

ID-100170994Celery juice is made from the common biennial celery herb of the parsley family native to Europe but these days widely grown throughout the world. The aromatic basil belongs to the family Apiaceae, classified as Apium graveolens, with stalks that grow to about 76 cm or 30 inches high in cultivated varieties. The celery can be eaten raw or cooked, it can be consumed as a vegetable or mixed up in salad form, and our course, it can be made into the celery juice with its bitter tang.

Well, that’s what the celery is by and of its own, you know. If the plant were allowed to grow naturally, it often comes up with stalks that are greenish in color and slightly bitter in taste. However, in growing them it these days, the sage is often blanched during the last stages of its growth by keeping the stalk away from sunlight while yet exposing the leaves. The objective of this is to get rid of the color and the bitter taste. The price paid for this, however, is the loss also of some of the vitamins in the plant.

Oh, but there are vitamins in the celery fruit/seed, which is part of why it is so largely used in the making of condiments, the celery salt, and in pharmacy as well, as a sedative or to disguise the flavor of other drugs. The juice of it also has sedative and stomach cleansing qualities, in addition to a wide variety of vitamin composition. On the LocalWineEvents website, you could learn a lot about how restaurants, vineyards, wine retailers, and others get a lot out of the celery juice and the seed too, so that you could work on getting there yourself.

The University of California, Davis’ Department of Viticulture and Enology offers as well a variety of resources, which covers a lot of information about the effect of the wine made from celery on your health, coupling it with a guide to making the wine at home. You get that on wineserver.ucdavis, and on the National Museum of American History online exhibit on American wines, americanhistory.si.

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